2021 National Healthcare DEI Conference

Managing Pandemics: Recover, Restore, Renew

July 27-28, 2021

Welcome

Welcome to the Healthcare Diversity Council! Here we strongly believe in a global representation in hospitals and clinics across the country, that every healthcare institution should mirror the environment and patients that it serves.

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Who Are We

Vision
Be the preeminent resource for information on cultural awareness and…

Mission
Engage in dialog and action with the healthcare community on inclusion…

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Get Involved

There are many opportunities to volunteer your time and talent in creating greater diversity and inclusion in Healthcare. Our volunteers get involved in all aspects of event planning and implementation, as well as outreach, communication, and advocacy within their organization and the community…

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National Coalition for Racial Justice & Equity Anti-Racism Pledge for CEOs

Our Partners

Arkansas Children's Hospital
Benchmark Research
Blue Cross Blue Shield of Louisiana
Cross Country Healthcare
Envision2bWell, Inc.
Galen College of Nursing
HealthTrackRx
Humboldt General Hospital
Lifespan
Patterson Bryant
Rho
UT MD Anderson Cancer Center

Healthcare News

  • Supporting Front-line Workers with Resiliency Training
    by Jess Williams

    Front-line workers are always at risk. It’s in the name. The COVID-19 pandemic has made this reality more salient for everyone. Risks of sickness from COVID-19 include death and morbidity. Front-line workers may also have lost more friends and co-workers than the average person. Healthcare workers have also been subject to violence and see the… Read More » Author information Jess Williams Assistant Professor at University of Kansas School of Medicine Jessica A. Williams, PhD, MA is an Associate Professor of Health Policy and Administration at The Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Williams has been a member of the editorial board since 2013. Her research examines how workplace psychosocial factors affect the health and well-being of employees. Specifically, she investigates the role of pain in work disability and well-being. In addition, she researches the utilization of preventive medical services. She holds a Doctorate in Health Policy and Management from the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, a Master's in Economics from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and a BA in economics from Stanford University. | Twitter | LinkedIn | The post Supporting Front-line Workers with Resiliency Training appeared first on The Medical Care Blog.

  • Multimorbidity and Psychosocial Aspects of Homelessness
    by Ben King

    Homelessness persists in the US, and across the world, despite decades of recognition and longstanding efforts to end the condition. There have been major successes in our understanding of what policies and programs work to prevent and end homelessness. However, the work must and will find new ways to adapt and improve if we are… Read More » Author information Ben King Research Scientist at UT Austin, Dell Medical School Ben King is an epidemiologist and a Clinical Assistant Professor at the University of Houston College of Medicine, in the Department of Health Systems and Population Health Sciences. He is also a statistician in the Human Integrated Health Systems Sciences Institute at UH and the President of Methods & Results, a research consulting service. His own research is often focused on the intersection between housing, homelessness, & health. Other interests include neuro-emergencies, diagnostics, and a bunch of meta-analytic methods like measurement validation & replication studies. For what it's worth he has degrees in neuroscience, community health management, and epidemiology. | LinkedIn | The post Multimorbidity and Psychosocial Aspects of Homelessness appeared first on The Medical Care Blog.

  • Tracking Community Benefit Spending
    by Alexa Ortiz

    Nonprofit hospitals make up the majority of hospitals in the US. In exchange for their tax-exempt status, the federal government requires these hospitals to provide support in the form of community benefits.  Tracking community benefit spending and its impact is important to ensure that such spending aligns with community needs. Community benefit activities can include… Read More » Author information Alexa Ortiz Health IT Scientist at RTI International Alexa Ortiz graduated from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte in 2009 with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing. Before receiving her graduate degree she was a practicing nurse for five years and has clinical experience in the field of both Cardiology and Neurology. In 2014 she received a Master of Science in Nursing specializing in nursing informatics from Duke University. Presently, she works as a Health IT Scientist at RTI International in the Center for Digital Health and Clinical Informatics. Despite no longer working in a clinical setting, she continues to maintain an active nurse license in the state of North Carolina. Her primary areas of research at RTI International focus on the clinical implementation of health information technology and the evaluation of consumer wearable devices. | Twitter | The post Tracking Community Benefit Spending appeared first on The Medical Care Blog.

  • Imputing Race & Ethnicity: Part 2
    by Lisa Lines & Jamie Humphrey

    Part 1 of this two-part series laid out arguments for and shortcomings of imputing race/ethnicity from the perspective of health equity. In this post, we’ll talk about gaps in the evidence and a few alternatives to imputation, including approaches involving population-level and neighborhood-level data. Imputation is a common solution to deal with “the missing-data problem.”… Read More » Author information Lisa Lines Senior health services researcher at RTI International Lisa M. Lines, PhD, MPH is a senior health services researcher at RTI International, an independent, non-profit research institute. She is also an Assistant Professor in Population and Quantitative Health Sciences at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Her research focuses on quality of care, care experiences, and health outcomes, particularly among people with chronic or serious illnesses. She is co-editor of TheMedicalCareBlog.com and serves on the Medical Care Editorial Board. She also serves as chair of the APHA Medical Care Section's Health Equity Committee. Views expressed are the author's and do not necessarily reflect those of RTI or UMass Medical School. | Twitter | LinkedIn | The post Imputing Race & Ethnicity: Part 2 appeared first on The Medical Care Blog.

  • Imputing Race & Ethnicity: Part 1
    by Lisa Lines & Jamie Humphrey

    In Part 1 of this two-part series, we lay out arguments for and shortcomings of imputing race/ethnicity from the perspective of health equity. In Part 2, we’ll talk about evidence gaps and research needed, as well as a few alternative approaches. The Biden administration is focusing on health equity and improved data collection to measure… Read More » Author information Lisa Lines Senior health services researcher at RTI International Lisa M. Lines, PhD, MPH is a senior health services researcher at RTI International, an independent, non-profit research institute. She is also an Assistant Professor in Population and Quantitative Health Sciences at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Her research focuses on quality of care, care experiences, and health outcomes, particularly among people with chronic or serious illnesses. She is co-editor of TheMedicalCareBlog.com and serves on the Medical Care Editorial Board. She also serves as chair of the APHA Medical Care Section's Health Equity Committee. Views expressed are the author's and do not necessarily reflect those of RTI or UMass Medical School. | Twitter | LinkedIn | The post Imputing Race & Ethnicity: Part 1 appeared first on The Medical Care Blog.

  • Discovering Patient-Centered Care
    by Joe Babaian

    Blog by Joe Babaian The good physician treats the disease; the great physician treats the patient who has the disease. ~ Sir William Osler, M.D. Let’s visit care at the N of 1. During this fraught time of pandemic, patient focus ranges from the personalized care we expect (or should expect) to the detrimental rejection of

  • Global health spending: immigrant and refugee seniors
    by Colin Hung

    Join us on Tuesday, September 14 at 8:30 EST (for your local time click here), as we explore ways to address the competing challenges for immigrant seniors experiencing social isolation during this pandemic. We will be joined by Shanthi Johnson @ShanthiJohnson, the Dean of the School of Public Health at the University of Alberta, who

  • Failures and Mistakes – Owning & Learning From Them
    by Colin Hung

    Apologies for the last-minuteness of this HCLDR blog post… Tonight on our the weekly HCLDR tweetchat, I thought it would be interesting to discuss mistakes and failures – specifically how we can own them and learn from them. I should clarify, that when I say “mistake” I’m not necessarily referring to medical errors or adverse

  • Health Apps: Good, Bad, and Regulation?
    by Colin Hung

    Health apps are meant to be easy and convenient tools that help us live healthier, change bad habits into good ones, help us manage chronic conditions…the list is endless. Look up any health-related topic on Apple’s App Store or Google Play and you’ll get dozens, if not hundreds of apps. But how do you know

  • Remembering The Forgotten Patients
    by Joe Babaian

    Blog post by Joe Babaian Hi, I exist.     ~ Said by anyone overlooked, if they could only find their voice During this ongoing pandemic, we see the significant impacts on healthcare, including changing methods of delivery. From telehealth’s vigorous ascendancy (to a plateau of sorts), to in-person clinical care walking the tremulous line of reconsidering

  • WHO issues its first emergency use validation for a COVID-19 vaccine and emphasizes need for equitable global access

    The World Health Organization (WHO) today listed the Comirnaty, COVID-19 mRNA vaccine for emergency use, making the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine the first to receive emergency validation from WHO since the outbreak began a year ago.

  • COVID-19: One year later – WHO Director-General’s new year message

    In his end of year message for 2020, WHO Director-General says there is light at the end of the tunnel in the fight against COVID-19. But going into 2021, he urges countries and communities to work together, in solidarity, to overcome this and future health challenges.

  • Mobilizing youth to End TB

    Since the global youth movement, 1+1 youth Initiative was launched on World TB Day 2019, followed by the  adoption of the Youth Declaration to End TB at the first-ever Global Youth Townhall on ending TB, there has been significant progress over the past year. The 1+1 Initiative has expanded to include thousands of youth across the world in countries like Bangladesh, Nepal, India, Indonesia, Philippines,  and Vietnam.The social media platforms set up as part of the 1+1 youth initiative are joined and followed by more than 15000 young people including WHO End TB forum. Similarly, Global TB Programme has established #Youth2EndTB Global Youth Network where more than 1800 youths from 95+ countries have already joined.  Besides, in order to recognise the youth efforts and encourage youth engagement on ending TB, youth story series was conducted.Moreover, 50 and more different youth-led activities and virtual events on ending TB have been conducted worldwide. This includes  sensitizing young people, peer education trainings in schools and universities,and encouraging them to become TB advocates, and supporting TB patients in the community with resources, advice, and encouragement. In addition, we are enthusiastic about cross country youth dialogue series that have been started where youths from different countries can participate and learn from each other.For instance, one of the inspiring examples is that of Nepal, young people in this country have established national and provincial youth networks to help young people, through capacity building and in ensuring their participation in policy making and community level awareness building programmes. Likewise, in March 2020, Vietnam National Tuberculosis program launched National Youth Movement against TB which aims on reaching 10 million young people as well as educating all primary school students with TB knowledge and good practices on combating TB and lung diseases.Another exciting example is from Indonesia. Their national youth movement against TB has been conducting Art exhibitions as well as creating TB awareness through social media campaign.Furthermore, WHO Global TB Program is currently developing training manual targeting End TB youth leaders, young survivors, and young health professionals. It will be available at End TB channel of Open WHO platform after completing it's six regional youth consultations.

  • Behavioural considerations for acceptance and uptake of COVID-19 vaccines

    The Behavioural Insights Unit of the WHO released a meeting report of the Technical Advisory Group (TAG) on the special session on acceptance and uptake of COVID-19 vaccines, held on 15 October 2020. The meeting report outlines the factors that drive people’s behaviour in relation to vaccine acceptance and uptake: an enabling environment, social influences and motivation. The image above is a visual narration that captures highlights of the meeting on 15 October 2020, during which the TAG on Behavioural Insights and Sciences for Health discussed behavioural considerations in relation to COVID-19 vaccine acceptance and uptake. The discussion was structured around three key questions. Download the graphic   

  • Joint statement calling for urgent country scale-up of access to optimal HIV treatment for infants and children living with HIV

    Global partners that are committed to ending paediatric AIDS have come together to call on countries to rapidly scale up access to optimal, child-friendly HIV treatment for infants and children.